Let’s talk adjectives!   I’ve been teaching Norwegian for several years now and I never get tired of teaching my students how to decline adjectives correctly. The reason I love sharing Norwegian adjective rules with students is because we actually do have rules and if you understand them – you will never make another adjective…

Analysing Norwegian Grammar

Analysing Norwegian Grammar – Part 1

Tor is in the wood shop this week. From there he will demonstrate some very simple principles of grammatical analysis. – Do try this at home!   Ordklasser and Setningsledd - What’s the difference?   It may be decades since you last thought about conjugating irregular verbs or memorizing the correct gender of a noun.…

Cookingup_Sentence_Norwegian

Recipes for Norwegian Sentences – Part 1

– Already mastered the basics of sentence cooking? Check back for more “complex flavors” in later blogs. Norskbloggen will take you all the way to your first Michelin star !   Cooking up a sentence in Norwegian is pretty easy if you follow these simple recipes   When I go traveling to different countries, what…

10tips

10 tips for learning Norwegian fast

Learning a language quickly can be a challenge in a country where most people speak English and insist on practicing it on foreigners.

Screenshot 2016-06-08 00.52.08

How to pronounce the Norwegian ‘rolling’ R

  Are you struggling with pronouncing R? Well, not after doing these exercises every day for a month I often have students who find it really hard to roll their R’s at the front of their mouth, especially when the R comes before a vowel.   Here are two tips to help you get better…

Ephraim helped us and won travel voucher worth 5000 kroner

Ephraim helped Lingu and wins travel voucher worth 5000 kroner!

Innovation is the way forward! The world is changing, technology and science are advancing – and so is Lingu!   We are very happy that so many of you took the opportunity to guide us in creating the most optimal way of learning a language! All your great and very thorough answers have been registered, gone…

Confusion of languages

Bokmål, nynorsk and the Norwegian dialects

The confusion of languages! A research conducted in Lingu Stavanger AS, by Agnes W. Hoftun     So what on earth is the difference between bokmål, nynorsk and the Norwegian dialects?   About the project   First of all, I want to thank my interviewees for taking the time to participate in my project. In October…

adjektiv

Learn Norwegian Adjectives part II

So in our last blog post we went through the correct use of adjectives in the indefinite form in Norwegian. You know, phrases like, en fin bil (a nice car) et fint eple (a nice apple). This time we will look at adjectives in the definite form. Like how to correctly talk or write about…

blogposttalking

Two common small talk topics

Hva skal du i helga? Learn to talk about your plans for the weekend the right away. We love talking about the weekend. Already on Thursday the question comes up and on Monday you colleagues will ask you what you did. So here are some useful phrases:   I helga skal jeg…. (This weekend I…

norwegianpronunciation

7 easy tricks for a better Norwegian pronunciation

We know that it takes effort to learn a new language, but we also know that there are many easy tricks that can help you improve your language significantly. We would like to share some of them with our blog readers. Below you’ll find 7 easy tricks to learn a better Norwegian pronunciation. G is…

adjektiv

Learn Norwegian Adjectives

I’ve been teaching Norwegian for 5 years now and I never get tired of teaching students to use adjectives correctly. It’s a known fact that native speakers use more adjectives than non-native speakers. So if you want to speak like a native and be able to express precisely what you mean, pay attention. The reason…

Learn Norwegian the fast way – fast track language courses

Lingu specialises in providing quick and effective Norwegian courses to expats and professionals who want or need to learn Norwegian in Oslo, Stavanger and online.

If you want to learn the Norwegian language, you have come to the right place. Our mission is to prepare expats, professionals and overseas students for working and living successfully and comfortably in Norway. To reach this objective, we use a blended learning approach that is designed to get you speaking in no time at all. The courses combine small groups and the best e-learning solutions, and our instructors will immerse you in language and encourage you to improve your language skills. Learning Norwegian has never been easier and more effective.

Here are a few things you get at Lingu:

  • Small groups with lots of cultural activities
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Lingu has a perfect location, the study rooms are clean and tidy and the teacher I have had is very patient, always positive & smiling. She takes the time to explain grammar or expressions and clarify texts, further we read, do listenings, exercises and talking. It’s a great combination of all you need!

– Anna (Slovakia)

I would gladly recommend Lingu to anyone wanting to learn the Norwegian language. The teachers are wonderful, material good, class size perfect, premises great.

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The course is for those who can catch up fast and digest quite big amount of information in a short span of time. But the beauty of it is that you master the language for professional aims very quickly.

– Malika (Turkmenistan)

The teacher involved us more in conversation and she was very supportive. I really enjoyed the course and will recommend it to my friends too!

Ashok (India)

I came to the course with little knowledge of the Norwegian language and through Lingu’s classes, web lessons and instructor aid and feedback I have learnt a wealth of information in the Norwegian language. I highly recommend Lingu.

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Tor is in the wood shop this week. From there he will demonstrate some very simple principles of grammatical analysis. – Do try this at home!

 

Ordklasser and Setningsledd – What’s the difference?

 

It may be decades since you last thought about conjugating irregular verbs or memorizing the correct gender of a noun. But here you are, back in school, learning Norwegian… Remember your last classroom grammar lesson? Was it tons of fun? Did you sleep through it? Did you run screaming out the door? In either case, here is a reminder of how EASY grammar can be:

 

With a little help from Tor you will soon be able to look at any piece of language and immediately have a sense of what’s going on.

 

The key lies within these TWO simple concepts:

 

på norsk:

ordklasser & setningsledd

 

in English:

word classes & clauses

 

in wood worker terms:

raw materials & the parts of our fancy upholstered chair

 

Tor is a keen “word worker” and he wants to build some “Norsk Språk” – in the same way a woodworker constructs a classy piece of furniture.

 

For now, let us imagine YOU’re that skilled woodworker, and that today you’re putting together a very nice, upholstered chair from scratch. Clever you!

 

Somewhere in your wood shop you’ll have collected all kinds of materials over the years – maybe you have a bunch of planks and wood scraps in the corner, or perhaps they are stored nicely on rafters under the ceiling… You have lots of different kinds of wood: pine, spruce, birch, some hardwood such as oak, some exotic balsa (super soft), mahogany and bamboo… Each type of wood i.e. the material has unique properties.

 

When it comes to making and joining together the chair, each part of it will have a clear structural function and you already know from your vast experience exactly what type of wood will work best for the legs, for the armrest, the seat and those fancy inlays on the back. Sometimes several pieces of wood are needed for one structural part, to strengthen, to decorate etc.

 

 

Tor’s grammatical construction is coming together much in the same way:

 

The minute your nice piece of oak wood goes from being just a piece of wood to, say, the armrest of your new chair, it is like when one of Tor’s nouns leaves the word class shelf and becomes the subject or part of the subject clause.

 

Word classes have properties

Clauses have functions

 

Simply put “Grammatical Analysis” is like taking a quick look at the finished chair and figuring out how it was put together. We analyse the chair on two levels:

  1. It’s main parts (setningsledd)
  2. What kind of materials have been used for each part (ordklasser)
  1. The main parts would be : four legs, two arm rests, the seat, the back…
  2. Possible materials : Birch,oak, pine, plus foam, fabric and nails if you go with upholstery.

Pretty simple, really.

 

Check out the next article in this series soon: Grammatical analysis – Part 2. Then Tor will share the secrets of exactly which word classes can be used for which clauses. You’ll be an seasoned word worker at the end of it!

– Already mastered the basics of sentence cooking? Check back for more “complex flavors” in later blogs. Norskbloggen will take you all the way to your first Michelin star !

 

Cooking up a sentence in Norwegian is pretty easy if you follow these simple recipes

 

When I go traveling to different countries, what I love most  is tasting different foods and hearing different languages spoken. It strikes me how basic ingredients like meat, fish, vegetables, grains and dairy are prepared to produce vastly different flavors from country to country.

 

And it is the same with language –  the special “flavor” and texture of a language develops when generations of people follow traditional “recipes” for speaking and writing. Each language’s “cooking practices” change slowly over time, inspired by the cuisines of other countries and cultures.

 

Basic Ingredients

The basic language ingredients are pretty similar all over the world, like oil, garlic and tomatoes. To cook up a decent sentence in Norwegian you will need all or some of these:

 

Subject (S)  – a doer

Verbal (V)    – an action

Object  (O)  – the thing or person acted upon (optional)

 

This looks fairly sparse and bland. Don’t worry, we will spice up this basic recipe in future articles. For now let us just also mention that the object can be direct or indirect and that in next week’s blog you can read more about clauses (setningsdeler) and word classes (ordklasser).

 

A word on word order

When you started learning Norwegian, many of you noticed that the order of words – even in basic sentenceswas a little different from what you were used to. This is precisely why it can take some time to get comfortable “cooking” sentences in an unfamiliar kitchen. I’ve noticed that some baking recipes ask you to “ha det våte i det tørre”, in other words “pour the wet (ingredients) into the dry”. Others order the exact opposite.

 

Linguists categorize Norwegian as an SVO – language meaning quite simply that we “stir in” our three main sentence ingredients in this order : Subject – Verb – Object.

 

For example:

S       V          O

Jeg elsker kjøttkaker

 

S-V-O is the most common indo-european “mixing” order. World languages like English, Chinese, Spanish, Russian, French and Portuguese are all SVO languages.

 

Other languages favor other combinations:

S-O-V is the typical sentence structure for neutral sentences in Arabic, Hindu, Urdu, Turkish and Japanese and in German (subordinate clauses)

 

So in these languages our example would read:

 

S        O           V

Jeg kjøttkaker elsker

 

And V-S-O is the normal word order for languages like Tagalog, Arabic and Classic Hebrew.

 

V      S         O

Elsker jeg kjøttkaker.

 


 
V2 – The Golden rule

 

In Norwegian, you can begin your sentence with almost any ingredient, but we are very picky about the second ingredient: It has to be the verb! – with very few exceptions – more about this in Part 2.  Our friends the linguists coined the phrase “V2” for this rule which remains strong in every Germanic language except English.

 

Some examples:

Jeg elsker kjøttkaker                ( elsker )

 

Jeg har aldri likt kjøttkaker      ( har … likt )

 

Vi skal lage kjøttkaker             ( skal lage )

 

Når blir det mat, egentlig?        ( blir )

 

If you remember this simple rule – the verbal clause in second place – your sentences will always have that authentic Norwegian flavor!

 

Next we’ll start cooking up some sentences:

 

Helsetninger

Leddsetninger

Spørsmål

Det – setninger
And much more –

10 tips for learning Norwegian FAST (and FREE of charge)

Learning a language quickly can be a challenge in a country where most people speak English and insist on practicing it on foreigners. However, it is important that you are persistent in using the language you are learning as much as possible. So rule number one is: Use the language no matter what.

Here you will find 10 practical tips for how to learn Norwegian fast

  1. Stick Post-it notes onto objects around you, in your home and at your office. Touch the objects whenever you see them and make a sentence with the word on the Post-it note. Say it out loud: “Jeg spiser ved BORDET”, ‘Jeg pusser tennene mine med TANNBØRSTEN”. (Forget about feeling awkward – you’re learning!)
  2. Memorise a few key Norwegian phrases, then replace nouns and verbs with new words. This way you’ll get used to the sentence structure.
  3. Memorise the numbers and pronouns right away. Don’t waste time on learning too advanced vocabulary that you are not likely to use in the beginning.
  4. Memorise vocabulary that is related to YOU, your everyday life and your work situation. The more relevant a word is for you, the more likely you are to remember it and start using it.
  5. Use simple and fun memory techniques to learn new vocabulary quickly. Try the free version of memolanguage.
  6. Ask your friends and colleagues to speak with you in Norwegian, or simply start a conversation in Norwegian. Doing this a few times will tell your colleagues that you are eager to practise your language skills, and most people will want to help you learn Norwegian fast.
  7. When you listen to TV or radio, try to listen for the verbs people use. Which inflection is being used? What does the choice of inflection do to the meaning?
  8. Listen to Norwegian radio while doing other things. Check out NRK’s free stations.
  9. Read newspapers in ‘lettnorsk’, ie. easy Norwegian. Check out Klar Tale and Utrop. These newspapers also offer recorded audio and videos in ‘lettnorsk’.
  10. Watch Norwegian films with English subtitles. Not only will you be able to pick up rapid Norwegian speech, but you will also learn something about the Norwegian culture, history and humour.

The keywords here are: fun, relevant and consistent. Use the language in as many contexts as possible and you’ll soon be learning Norwegian quickly and with persistence!

 

Good luck and have fun!

 

PS: This post was originally published in 2013, but has been updated and reposted for new readers.

 

Are you struggling with pronouncing R? Well, not after doing these exercises every day for a month

I often have students who find it really hard to roll their R’s at the front of their mouth, especially when the R comes before a vowel.

 

Here are two tips to help you get better at this:

Say ‘t’ and then ‘d’ after each other really fast – td, td, td, td, td.

Why? When your tongue moves from saying ‘t’ to ‘d’ really quickly you are actually moving your tongue in exactly the same way as when you say the Norwegian R. Repeat it a couple of times every day.

Put ‘d’ in front of the R.

So if the sentence is ‘Rune ringte Roald’, say: Drune dringte droald.

The idea here is to get creative and make up sentences with several words starting with an R and then put a D before each word starting with R. And of course practice every day.

Why?

When speaking the d-sound, you position you tongue in the correct place to make a rolling R, which makes it easier to pronounce the R.

 

Do these tricks and very soon you’ll be rolling your R’s more easily 😉

Innovation is the way forward! The world is changing, technology and science are advancing – and so is Lingu!

 

We are very happy that so many of you took the opportunity to guide us in creating the most optimal way of learning a language! All your great and very thorough answers have been registered, gone over repeatedly, and are now puzzled together to form the foundation of a Game Changing, Tailor-Made & Flexible Language Course!

 

Over the next six months, we here at Lingu will develop a course that fulfills all your requirements for learning a language – today, and tomorrow! And as promised a selected few will be given the opportunity to test the product for free when we are ready to launch it. We will contact you all by email very shortly about this.

 

We are also thrilled to announce the winner of a 5000 kroner travel voucher for participating in the survey – Ephraim Vincent Florencio! Here is his story:

 

Ephraim came from the Philippines to Norway in July 2015,  shortly after meeting his wife. She was already settled in Norway and was visiting her relatives in the Philippines. They fell in love, got married a while later, and Ephraim followed her to Norway.

 

Here in Norway he works as a cleaner, but originally he was a sailor. So understandably his main goal is to work as a sailor in Norway too. However, when trying to apply for such a job, he was told to enhance his Norwegian language skills before they could employ him. Therefore his aim is to pass the B1 level and the official Norwegian test, so that he gets the chance to work with what he loves – sailing!

 

Ephraim is attending online courses to learn Norwegian as quickly as possible and he tries to actively practice Norwegian as much as he can with friends and family. He tells us that he wishes could have attended regular classes in Stavanger where he lives, but his work schedule varies so much that it prevents him from attending classes on a regular basis. Online self-study requires more discipline and focus than attending classes. But it is great fun too, as he gets the chance to communicate with other students and the teacher in the virtual classes that comes with the course he’s doing now.

 

Because of all of this, Ephraim was very excited to be a part of creating a new product with Lingu, which will allow him a quality course with more guidance and full flexibility in regards combining studies with his everyday life. He says:

 

I really want to be able communicate with Norwegian people better than today, and I want to land my dream job. I think that education in the future should focus on flexibility due to our very busy lifestyles and that a combination of classroom tutoring with online resources such as lectures and video lessons are the way to go.

 

When asked about the travel voucher he just won he said:

 

I cannot believe I won, and I don’t think I know for sure that it was real before I met you today. I am so happy to know it is for real!

 

Since we wouldn’t believe our good fortune we didn’t want to make any fixed plans before me coming here to meet you today, but my wife has many wishes! She would love to visit Rome, Paris or Amsterdam, or we might use it for our travel to visit our relatives in the Philippines next year!”

 

We wish Ephraim and his wife: Bon Voyage! Safe Travel! God Tur!

The confusion of languages!

A research conducted in Lingu Stavanger AS, by Agnes W. Hoftun

 

Confusion of languages

 

So what on earth is the difference between bokmål, nynorsk and the Norwegian dialects?

 

About the project

 

First of all, I want to thank my interviewees for taking the time to participate in my project. In October and November I was working on a sociolinguistics project as a part of my master studies in literacy. I interviewed seven randomly chosen students at Lingu in order to find out how much you know about the Norwegian languages and what you think of the situation.

 

It seems like there is a lot of confusion about the official languages in Norway. Most of you have heard of bokmål, nynorsk and the dialects but many of you don’t know what bokmål and nynorsk are or how they are related to the dialects. Below I will briefly explain it for you.

 

Norsk, bokmål eller nynorsk?

 

The official languages in Norway are Norwegian and Sami. Bokmål and nynorsk are two written standards of Norwegian. As many of you already know, most of the population write bokmål. Around 13% choose nynorsk in their writing. These two written standards are equal when it comes to public services. At school children learn one standard as main (hovedmål) and the other one as secondary language form (sidemål).

 

There have been many discussions and many people have strong opinions about whether we should keep two written standards or not, not only at school but in general. At the university level you can often choose freely unless you study Norwegian language like me. Then you have to be able to write both standards well. I myself write nynorsk when I am free to choose.

 

We can say that bokmål is a norwegianized Danish. Nynorsk is based on the dialects. One of the interviewees said that nynorsk is «a mix of all the dialects» and indeed we can say it is. We can also say that bokmål and nynorsk are similar. Many words are the same, some words are slightly different, while other look completely different. There are also some differences when it comes to grammar and sentence structure. Compare the examples:

 

English: I — bokmål: jeg — nynorsk: eg

 

English: we — bokmål: vi — nynorsk: vi or me

 

English: not — bokmål: ikke — nynorsk: ikkje

 

Here at Lingu, like in most language schools, the written standard that we teach is bokmål.

 

So what about spoken Norwegian?

 

I am sure you have noticed that we have dialects. MANY dialects. And this fact itself is of course not unusual as compared to many other countries. But what is unique here, is that you can speak your dialect in practically every situation. Some dialects are similar to bokmål and some to nynorsk. Even though you can hear people saying: «She speaks bokmål.», they often mean an Eastern Norwegian dialect.

 

The most important fact is that we don’t have a spoken standard like for example standard American English or standard British English. Of course there is spoken bokmål and spoken nynorsk, but mainly in contexts like news broadcasts when a news presenter reads the news.

 

If you want to learn more about the Stavanger dialect, we have an online course available on our website www.lingu.no called Master the Stavanger dialect.

 

I hope you are feeling more confident when it comes to the basics about the language you are learning. And remember: Every new month is another chance to continue learning Norwegian! Looking forward to seeing you in class!

 

Best regards,

Agnes W. HoftunAgnes W. Hoftun
Agnes is an enthusiastic and experienced Norwegian teacher. In addition to working at Lingu, she is a master’s degree student in Literacy at Stavanger University where she also works as a teaching assistant for bachelor’s degree students. Agnes has earned a bachelor’s degree in Nordic languages and literature with English as a minor subject from Stavanger University and she has taken academic courses in adult language acquisition at Stavanger and Bergen University.

adjektivSo in our last blog post we went through the correct use of adjectives in the indefinite form in Norwegian.

You know, phrases like, en fin bil (a nice car) et fint eple (a nice apple). This time we will look at adjectives in the definite form. Like how to correctly talk or write about the great summer weather in Oslo (you might not think the weather is so great but at least you will after reading this post about learning to say it correctly).

Adjectives in the definite form – The main pattern

So let’s start with the main rule or main pattern – it is quite simple and goes like this:

In the definite form, adjectives which come in front of a noun get an “e”.

So if the adjective is “fin” it becomes “fine” regardless of which gender the noun is.

So the word “epler” meaning apples is a neatrual noun in Norwegian, while the noun “bil” is a masculine noun and the adjective has the same form in front of them both:

 

Fine bilen (the nice car)

Fine eplet (the nice apple)

Even if the noun is in plural the adjective stays the same in definite:

Fine bilene

Fine eplene

Easy? Yes it is, but wait there is one more thing.

  • The definite article of the adjective

So in Norwegian, the adjective has its own article in the definite form. If the noun in front of the adjective is masculine or feminine the adjective gets the article den in front of it while the adjective in front of a neutral noun gets the article det. Adjectives which come in front of a noun in the definite form plural gets the article de.

So it looks like this:

 

Masculine/feminine definiteNeutral definitePlural definite
Den fine bilenDet fine epletDe fine bilene
Den fine stolen (chair)Det fine bordet (table)De bordene (tables)
Den fine stuen/stua(living room)Det fine soverommet (bedroom)De fine soverommene (bedrooms)

 

 

Adjectives in the definite form – Exceptions

Yes, there are exceptions, there always are. However, keep calm because they are easy to learn and there aren’t too many.

So the main exceptions are:

  • Some adjectives don’t get an ‘e’ in the definite form (there aren’t many)

Blå, grå, rosa

Masculine/feminine definiteNeutral definitePlural definite
Den blå bilen (The blue car)Det blå huset (The blue house)De blå bilene (The blue cars)
Den rosa stolen (The pink chair)Det rosa bordet (The pink table)De rosa bordene (The pink tables)
Den grå stuen/stua (The grey living room)Det grå soverommet (The grey bedroom)De grå soverommene (The grey bedrooms)

 

  • Some adjectives always stay the same no matter the form of the noun.

Here are some of the most used ones:

bra (good)

sky (shy)

annerledes (different)

direkte (direct)

ekstra (extra)

gratis (free)

moderne (modern)

spennende (exiting)

stille (quiet)

  • Adjectives ending with er, el and en in the definite form.

The last letter changes place with adjectives that end with er, el, en and e.

 

Sliten (tired)

voksen (grown up)

vakker (beautiful)

gammel (old)

spinkel (thin)

 

Masculine/feminine definiteNeutral definitePlural definite
Den slitne mannen (The tired man)Det slitne barnet (The tired child)De slitene mennene (The tired men)
Den voksne damen/dama (The grownup woman)Det voksne mennesket (The grownup human)De voksne meneskene (The grownups (humans))
Den vakre hagen (The beautiful garden)Det vakre huset (The beautiful house)De vakre husene(The beautiful houses)
Den gamle kommoden (The old dresser)Det gamle skapet (The old closet)De gamle skapene (The old closets)
Den spinkle gutten (The thin/gangly boy)Det spinkle barnet(The thin/gangly child)De spinkle guttene(The thin/gangly boys)

 

Notice that the adjectives ending with er, en or el where a double consonant comes before the ‘e’, one consonant is dropped and last letters switch places. This is because we try to avoid three consonants in a row in Norwegian if it is possible.

 

So how do you say “the great summer weather in Oslo”?

Here is some help – summer weather is written and pronounced as one word in Norwegian and the compound noun ‘summer weather’ is a neutral noun.

 

Still not sure?

– Scroll down for the correct answer:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Det fine sommerværet i Oslo

  1. Hva skal du i helga?
  2. Learn to talk about your plans for the weekend the right away. We love talking about the weekend. Already on Thursday the question comes up and on Monday you colleagues will ask you what you did. So here are some useful phrases:

     

    I helga skal jeg…. (This weekend I am going to…)

    I helga var jeg … (Last weekend I…)

    Det var kjempegøy (It was really fun)

    Jeg bare slappet av (I just relaxed)

    Also you when you ask some one what they will do or did this weekend (Hva skal du i helga? / Hva gjorde du i helga?) or did you have a nice weekend (Har du hatt en fin helg?) you can use phrases like:

    Det høres ut som en god helg (That sounds like a good weekend)

    Det hørtes ut som en god helg (That sounded like a good weekend)

    Å så deilig (Oh how nice)

    Å så koselig (Oh how cozy)

     

  3. There is always something to say about the weather
  4. For et vær! (What nice weather however it could also mean that the weather is bad – you’re just saying that it is exceptional)

    Å så deilig vær (Oh what nice weather)

    Uff, så grått det er ute (oh, what a grey and dreary day)

    I dag er det surt (Today it is “sour” – meaning that it could be cold and windy and just generally uninspiring)

    Nå bøtter det ned (Now it’s pouring rain)

We know that it takes effort to learn a new language, but we also know that there are many easy tricks that can help you improve your language significantly. We would like to share some of them with our blog readers. Below you’ll find 7 easy tricks to learn a better Norwegian pronunciation.

  1. G is often pronounced as “j” in front of y, i and j
  2.  
     

    Vi skriver /we write

    Vi sier / we say

    giftjift
    gjørejøre
    begynnebejynne

     

  3. Don’t pronounce “h” in front of v and j
  4. Vi skriver

    Vi sier

    Hvava
    Hvemvem
    Hjelpjelp
    Hjemmejemme
    Hvitvit
  5. “O” is often pronounced “å” when it is in front of two consonants.
  6. Vi sier

    Vi skriver

    Kommerkåmmer
    Godtgådt
    ogsååsså

     

  7. Don’t pronounce the “g” in words ending with “lig”
  8. Vi skriver

    Vi sier

    Hyggelighyggeli
    Veldigveldi
    Koseligkoseli

     

  9. After a long vowel the “d” is often silent
  10. Vi sier

    Vi skriver

    Godgo’
    brødBrø’

     

  11. Don’t pronounce the “d” in ld and nd.
  12. Vi skriver

    Vi sier

    Kald, kaldtKall, kalt
    Vind, vindenVinn, vinnen

     

  13. “E” is often pronounced as æ
  14. Vi skriver

    Vi sier

    Herhær
    Erær

adjektivI’ve been teaching Norwegian for 5 years now and I never get tired of teaching students to use adjectives correctly.

It’s a known fact that native speakers use more adjectives than non-native speakers. So if you want to speak like a native and be able to express precisely what you mean, pay attention.

The reason why I love presenting Norwegian adjective rules to students is because we actually do have rules and if you really understand them – you will never make another adjective mistake again!

 

Lets start with the main pattern for indefinite

For this example I will use the adjective “fin” which means “fine” or “nice”. So in Norwegian we have three genders, but if you live in Oslo – just make it easy for yourself – use two – it is perfectly correct! So we will use hankjønn (masculine) and intetkjønn (neutral).

 

En bil (a car)

Et eple (an apple)

 

If want to say a nice car or a nice apple we have to add “fin”.

 

En fin bil

Et fint eple

 

So in masculine the adjective stays the same while in neutral you have to add a “t”. And if you want to say nice cars or nice apples you just add an “e” to the regular form of the adjective making them plurals. That’s right! We have plural adjectives in Norwegian.

 

To fine biler

To fine epler

 

So the main rules are

  1. In masculine the adjective stays the same
  2. In neutral you add an “t” and in plural you add an “e”

 

Masculine singularNeutral singularMasculine pluralNeutral plural
En fin bilEt fint epleFine bilerFine epler
En rød bilEt rødt epleRøde bilerRøde epler
En stor bilEt stort epleStore bilerStore epler

 

 

Main exceptions

  • Norwegian adjectives that end with a double consonant, loses one when you add an “t” in neutral

 

Masculine singularNeutral singularMasculine pluralNeutral plural
En trygg by (a safe city)Et trygt land (a safe country)Trygge byer (safe cities)Trygge land (safe countries)
En tynn person (a thin person)Et tynt menneske(a thin human)Tynne personer(thin persons)Tynne mennesker(thin humans)
En grønn bil(a green car)Et grønt eple (a green apple)Grønne biler (green cars)Grønne epler (green apples)

 

  • Words ending with “-ig”, consonant + t and nationality words does not get an “t” in neutral.
Masculine singularNeutral singularMasculine pluralNeutral plural
En hyggelig by (a nice city)Et hyggelig land (a nice country)Hyggelige byer (nice cities)Hyggelige land (nice countries)
En norsk person(a Norwegian person)Et norsk menneske (a Norwegian human)Norske personer(Norwegian persons)Norske mennesker(Norwegian humans)
En interessant person(a interesting person)Et interessant menneske(a interesting human)Interessante personer(interesting persons)Interessante mennesker(interesting humans)

 

Other exceptions

  • These Norwegian adjectives end with a double t with intetkjønn nouns.

 

Fri, ny, grå, blå

 

Et fritt land (a free country)

et nytt kjøkken (a new kitchen)

et grått hus (a gray house)

et blått bord (a blue table)

 

  1. These Norwegian adjectives do not change with any form of the noun.

Bra (good)

moderne (modern)

gratis (free (does not cost anything)

felles (common)

 

And that’s it! For correct adjective usage in definite form keep checking the blog or submit and get it sent to your email!

Ha en fin dag 😉